Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins (Miguel A. De La Torre)

If your Christian theology leads you to a Gospel that is not “Good News” to all – including, and especially, people who live on the margins of society – then it’s not the Gospel.

Title (Year Published) – Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins (2004)

Author – Miguel A. De La Torre

Page count – 264

Rating – Buy/Borrow/Bypass + Goodreads 4/5

Hoo boy. This book got me all riled up. For the last few years – although the last 10 months have amplified things – I’ve been constantly going back and forth between 1) devouring the books/words/testimonies of liberation theologians and valuing the good the Christian Gospel can do when it is enacted in people’s lives in healing, sustaining, life-giving ways, and 2) being consumed by anger at people who claim Christianity yet act in ways and perpetuate systems that oppress the very people the Gospel is supposed to be Good News for – the poor, the sick, the hungry, the homeless. Christians seem to think they can say a prayer and forget that we’re supposed to act, to actually be the hands, feet, and mouth of Jesus. Continue reading “Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins (Miguel A. De La Torre)”

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Spinster (Kate Bolick)

I’m so happy I finally got my hands on this book! My one criticism is that, at times, the pace slowed down just a bit too much. Otherwise, I found this to be a fascinating examination of several interesting literary women and a balm to my happily-single heart.

Title/Year – Spinster: Making a life of one’s own (2015)

Author – Kate Bolick

Page count – 297

Rating – Buy/Borrow/Bypass + Goodreads 4/5 (Really Liked It)

This book is technically a memoir because Bolick weaves in her own relationship experiences as a single woman. But she focuses heavily on the histories of five literary pioneers she holds as role models for her own life – the essayist Maeve Brennan, the columnist Neith Boyce, the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, the novelist Edith Wharton, and the social visionary Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Continue reading “Spinster (Kate Bolick)”

Small Victories (Anne Lamott)

I’ll be honest…I’m not super excited about this book I just finished. But I don’t want this whole post to be bland so I’m going to start you off with a suggestion to go check out a podcast I’ve been loving. As you know from my bio line under the title of this blog (or if you’ve read my older reviews), I am a big Harry Potter fan. Not a super fan, per se, but I’ve read the books countless times and hold movie marathons of the series almost as much as ABC Family. If you, too, like Harry Potter and would enjoy hearing two Canadian academics talk about the books/movies/associated events, then go check out Witch, Please. Politics, intersectional feminism, and whimsical sound effects abound!

Anyway…here’s my actual review of this in-no-way-related-to-Harry-Potter book 🙂

Title/Year – Small Victories: Spotting improbable moments of grace (2014)

Author – Anne Lamott

Page count – 286

Rating – Buy/Borrow/Bypass + Goodreads 3/5 (Liked It) Continue reading “Small Victories (Anne Lamott)”

A Million Little Pieces (James Frey)

It’s hard to place this book in one particular category. Is it a memoir? Is it fiction or non-fiction? It’s marketed as a true account of Frey’s time in rehab, but there is some dispute about whether all events are completely accurate. While I do think there should be some sort of disclaimer about “artistic liberties” or exaggeration, I also think that anyone who reads a memoir and believes that everything is 100% real with no stretching the truth to make the story more interesting from a marketing perspective…is fooling themselves.

I also believe that stories don’t have to be true to teach us something. Fiction has just as much power to take us to another world and empathize with people/characters whose experiences differ from our own. And that’s what this book did for me.

Title – A Million Little Pieces

Author – James Frey

Page count – 430

Rating – Borrow (I put this at a 4/5 “Really Liked It” on Goodreads, and I would recommend it…but I don’t know that I can read it again.)

(Big ol’ CW/TW on this story for: addiction, alcohol, drugs, rape, abuse) Continue reading “A Million Little Pieces (James Frey)”

Nobody Knows My Name (James Baldwin)

No, I didn’t finish this book in just one day! I was reading this alongside my last two books and happened to finish it at about the same time as Shrill. So you get two reviews in two days…Lucky you 🙂

Title – Nobody Knows My Name

Author – James Baldwin

Page count – 190

Rating* – Borrow

(*Rating system taken from Book Riot’s “Buy/Borrow/Bypass” tag)

This book is actually a collection of essays. Baldwin did write several novels, but he is perhaps even more well-known as an essayist. I picked up a few of his books after watching the Raoul Peck documentary I Am Not Your Negro (based on one of Baldwin’s unfinished manuscripts) and watching a few videos of speeches he gave (like this one – CW: the n-word). There’s something about his cadence when he speaks that keeps me enraptured. Continue reading “Nobody Knows My Name (James Baldwin)”

Shrill (Lindy West)

Please read this book. Especially if you’ve ever been someone who thinks that women are just “too sensitive” about online harassment, or if you think that fat people are “gross” or make comments about fat people’s bodies out of “concern for their health.” I think people believe those things because they’ve never really taken the time to truly listen to the voices of people actually living out those realities. Lindy West speaks about her experiences with humor and unapologetic grit – but also with far more grace and understanding than any of her tormentors deserve.

Title – Shrill: Notes from a loud woman

Author – Lindy West

Page count – 258

Rating – Borrow (Not one that I necessarily need to read again but would definitely recommend) Continue reading “Shrill (Lindy West)”

Just Mercy (Bryan Stevenson)

It seems cliché or exaggerated, but I can’t think of a book that’s ever affected me this deeply. I’ve had emotional reactions to books before, but this was different. Several times I had to put the book down because I couldn’t stop crying. It felt so visceral I almost couldn’t breathe. If this wasn’t a library book, I might have actually thrown it across the room. The more I learn about America’s criminal justice system, the more baffled and frustrated and angry I become at how we* can fail people in such spectacular and cruel ways.

(*I almost put “it” here, but the point of this book is about recognizing humanity. When we pretend like we aren’t complicit in the system’s failings, we absolve ourselves of responsibility to change.)

Title – Just Mercy: A story of justice and redemption

Author – Bryan Stevenson

Page count – 314

Rating – Buy. No question. This would be a great book to use for a discussion group, especially at church (Although, while his faith background clearly informs his worldview, it’s not the main point of this story – this is a lesson for anyone and everyone). Continue reading “Just Mercy (Bryan Stevenson)”